Monday, December 29, 2008

Biblical Caregiving

Last Sunday's first reading was very appropriate for me, as I'm sure it is for so many people right now.
My son, take care of your father when he is old;
grieve him not as long as he lives.
Even if his mind fail, be considerate of him;
revile him not all the days of his life;
kindness to a father will not be forgotten,
firmly planted against the debt of your sins
—a house raised in justice to you. ~Sirach 3:12-14
As our priest pointed out, there was no such thing as "Alzheimer's" in biblical times, but people have been dealing with the aging process as long as there have been human beings. The price we pay for a long life, is often increased frailty and dependence on others. Even Christ pointed out that
Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go. ~John 21:18
We are all dependent upon one another's kindness to survive in this world. We are called to love each other as Jesus loved us. That is what marriage is all about and that is what being a human being is all about.

Jesus also gave his mother to St. John from the cross. Mary had no other children to take care of her after Jesus would die and ascend into heaven, so the Beloved Disciple was entrusted with her care.

Following his example, the Friends of St. John the Caregiver provides support and inspiration to those caring for a family member.

Click here for an article about how caregiving may actually lengthen life! Hat tip to SK for that one!

2 comments:

TACParent said...

When you look at it that way, sounds like you are in good hands. One thing it will teach you is how to manage your stress load. I'm glad you have found support on-line and in real life!

Dymphna (4HisChurch) said...

Very true about managing stress load!

Dymphna's favorite quotes


"Slavery ended in medieval Europe only because the church extended its sacraments to all slaves and then managed to impose a ban on the enslavement of Christians (and of Jews). Within the context of medieval Europe, that prohibition was effectively a rule of universal abolition. "— Rodney Stark

my poetry on the web

Karumi Garden

Karumi Garden
my haiku