Thursday, January 28, 2010

St. Thomas Aquinas--Pange Lingua Gloriosi

Today is the Feast of Saint Thomas Aquinas.  I found out at Mass today that he wrote the beautiful Pange Lingua Gloriosi, sung on Holy Thursday.



Here are the lyrics in English.

Sing, my tongue, the Savior's glory,
of His flesh the mystery sing;
of the Blood, all price exceeding,
shed by our immortal King,
destined, for the world's redemption,
from a noble womb to spring.

Of a pure and spotless Virgin
born for us on earth below,
He, as Man, with man conversing,
stayed, the seeds of truth to sow;
then He closed in solemn order
wondrously His life of woe.

On the night of that Last Supper,
seated with His chosen band,
He the Pascal victim eating,
first fulfills the Law's command;
then as Food to His Apostles
gives Himself with His own hand.

Word-made-Flesh, the bread of nature
by His word to Flesh He turns;
wine into His Blood He changes;
what though sense no change discerns?
Only be the heart in earnest,
faith her lesson quickly learns.

Down in adoration falling,
Lo! the sacred Host we hail;
Lo! o'er ancient forms departing,
newer rites of grace prevail;
faith for all defects supplying,
where the feeble senses fail.

To the everlasting Father,
and the Son who reigns on high,
with the Holy Ghost proceeding
forth from Each eternally,
be salvation, honor, blessing,
might and endless majesty.

Amen. Alleluia.

4 comments:

Paul said...

I absolutely love singing that. Did so once when I was cantoring and the substitute organist has to leave for another Mass.

Dymphna said...

That's the beauty of chant, isn't it? Shhhh! Don't tell the organists that!! ;)

jared said...

it truly is beautiful. Does anyone have a general idea of what this hymn is about?

Dymphna said...

The song is about the institution of the Holy Eucharist and is often sung during Communion.

Dymphna's favorite quotes


"Slavery ended in medieval Europe only because the church extended its sacraments to all slaves and then managed to impose a ban on the enslavement of Christians (and of Jews). Within the context of medieval Europe, that prohibition was effectively a rule of universal abolition. "— Rodney Stark

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