Tuesday, January 03, 2006

Stamp rate increase


Those of you who live in the U.S., remember that starting January 8, 2006, the rate for a first class letter goes up from 37 to 39 cents.

9 comments:

The Village Idiot said...

Wowzers! I can rember when stamps were closer to twenty cents than thirty, and now forty cents. I know that doesn't make me very old, but to think that the price of stamps has doubled in my short lifetime! Why do I care tho... i barely use stamps anyways.

That would by why the price goes up. My generation barely knows what a stamp is.

4HisChurch said...

That's very true! I was just thinking, "Gee, its time I join the 21st century and stop mailing my bills!"

Danny Garland Jr. said...

Gee, I remember when they were 25 cents and gas was a dollar a gallon....those were the days!

Moneybags said...

I remember when they were 32 cents for years...

Thanks for the reminder. I'll send everything off before the stamp increase then :)

4HisChurch said...

My dh claims to remember when a first class stamp was 5 cents. I think I remember 10 cents myself.

Carmel said...

Here in australia they are 50cents. which is equivalent to about the same in US dollars

Saint Peter's helpers said...

Thanks for the reminder. I wasn't sure when this was going to take effect. I do remember the 10 cent ones too. Stamps have come a long way... self-adhesive, and now make your own stamps.

4HisChurch said...

Carmel, I was wondering what postage is in Australia. Thanks for sharing! My dh is of the odd opinion that they should just up it to $1.00 and get it over with!

St. Peter's, you are right. Stamps have come a long way! The self stick ones are such a great idea!

pfadvice said...

While not well known, it's possible to get stamps at below face value - as much as 10% below. This is great for those who mail a lot or sell on online auctions.

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