Thursday, August 05, 2010

Second Chances in a Second Lent

Another great post from Paul at Sober Catholic.  He points out that tomorrow is the feast of the Transfiguration--40 days prior to the feast of the Triumph of the Cross.  Forty days is an important number in the church.  It is a time to reflect, a time to make new, a time to strengthen our resolve and a time to come to God in prayer.

In light of this I will post a 9 day Novena to Our Lord of the Transfiguration starting tomorrow.  Beginning on September 5, I'll post a Triumph of the Cross Novena to end on that feast. I'll see where God leads me on the rest of these 40 days.

Paul describes this time as a  "second Lent", a "do-over"--a time to re-do a Lent experience in a Church of second chances.

In this hot and dry time of year, we dearly need a second chance, a welcome respite, a drop of water in the desert.

Praise God for second chances!!

4 comments:

paulcoholic said...

Hi Dymphna!

Thank you very much for the plug. Although I never actually noticed the connection between the two feast days and there being 40 days between them until a few years ago. I forgot the source but it was some Catholic writer/theologian from years back. I picked up the reference in some daily devotional. I think I mentioned that in a previous posting a year or so ago about these feasts.

Paulcoholic

Dymphna said...

You're welcome, Paul! I thought it was a great idea! God knows I need all the second chances I can get!!

Barbara said...

It is so interesting you brought this up. Father Mark Kirby at Vultus Christi (http://vultus.stblogs.org/2010/07/midsummer-lent.html) wrote a great post this past week about Midsummer Lent and the Benedictine rule. It fits right in with this idea of 40 days between the Transfiguration and the Holy Cross.

Dymphna said...

Oh, that's neat! I'm going to have to stop by there! Thanks!

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