Monday, March 15, 2010

A New Daily Prayer Resource

I wanted to let you all know about a wonderful new site I've come across:  DivineOffice.org. It has the entire Liturgy of the Hours; Morning Prayer, Daytime Prayer, Evening Prayer, Office of Readings, Night Prayer, including music! When I pray morning prayer, it is frustrating to me as a musician, when I see a hymn printed out that I don't know the music to. This site solves that problem.

Another great thing about this site is that it is on podcast and you listen to a group praying, rather than feel as if you are praying alone.  It really highlights the fact that we are indeed praying with the entire Church.

They pray slowly and with much feeling.  No rote type praying here!

I've linked this site on my sidebar under the picture of the praying knight.

Hat Tip to Stumbling Back Home.

9 comments:

laymonk777 said...

Thanks for the blip.

Dymphna said...

You're welcome!

Observer said...

Hi, I just found your blog via a link on the Divine office; I am looking forward to exploring it further. But can you tell me how to pronounce the name Dymphna?

Dymphna said...

Thanks, Observer. Dymphna is pronounced "Dimpfna." At least that's how I pronounce it!

Observer said...

Thanks for the pronunciation of the name Dymphna; it is a little hard on the tongue, but I will do my best to pronounce it well.

I was unable to hear the Divine Office today; it just wouldn't load. Did you or any others have the same problem?

Dymphna said...

Sorry you weren't able to hear the Divine Office. I'm not having a problem this morning.

Dymphna said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dymphna said...

Observer, I just realized something today. For some reason, it seems that the Office of Readings is only available in written form and not in recorded form.

Dymphna said...

Update: Now it's working. Maybe it's a glitch.

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"Slavery ended in medieval Europe only because the church extended its sacraments to all slaves and then managed to impose a ban on the enslavement of Christians (and of Jews). Within the context of medieval Europe, that prohibition was effectively a rule of universal abolition. "— Rodney Stark

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