Thursday, December 31, 2009

It's Christmas!

Ok, its the 7th day of Christmas.  Nevertheless (why is that one word?) it is Christmas all over again here.

Allow me to explain.

The good thing about having ADD is when you (or in this case, I) lose things and think perhaps they disappeared, or that your ADD self in another life and time had inexplicably gotten rid of them for good, they miraculously turn up, safe and sound in your basement. Some even in plastic boxes.

I wanted to start on one of my new year's resolutions today--to redo my bedroom.  Well, my ADD had kicked in and I wanted it done NOW, which just isn't realistic.  In fact, doing much of anything at all is not realistic at this point for a variety of reasons involving logical consequences (is there a such thing as pre-consequences?)  Anyway, in utter frustration and disgust, I started cleaning out my basement instead.  After throwing away numerous boxes, I discovered some of dh's music that we've been looking for for the better part of a decade.  Also, I found some family pictures I have been wondering about.  So, now I get to run around my living room with a hammer and some nails, gleefully redecorating!!

Also, I found an Episcopal hymnal, which I've been wanting for some time.  I'd forgotten that we owned one.  Modern Catholicism is not known for its beautiful music, and during my foray into Anglicanism I became an admirer of their music.  Now dh and I can work up some of these hymns for Mass.

All in all, a good start to the new year.  (Ok, technically a good ending to the old year.)

4 comments:

Marilena said...

happy new years!

Dymphna said...

Happy New Year, Marilena!

TACParent said...

I am always amazed when I begin a decluttering project of the wonderful "gifts" I find within the piles of stuff. Sounds like you have a great start.

Dymphna said...

It is amazing!

Dymphna's favorite quotes


"Slavery ended in medieval Europe only because the church extended its sacraments to all slaves and then managed to impose a ban on the enslavement of Christians (and of Jews). Within the context of medieval Europe, that prohibition was effectively a rule of universal abolition. "— Rodney Stark

my poetry on the web

Karumi Garden

Karumi Garden
my haiku