Saturday, July 26, 2008

And With Your Spirit!!!!!!!!

Catholic World News reports that Rome has approved a new translation for a portion of the Roman missal for prayers used at Mass. During the proposed "pastoral preparation" period for introducing these changes to parishioners, it is hoped that some new musical settings for these texts will be written.

A few of the most important changes will be:

* At the Consecration, the priest will refer to Christ's blood which is "poured out for you and for many"-- an accurate translation of pro multis * At the Consecration, the priest will refer to Christ's blood which is "poured out for you and for many"-- an accurate translation of pro multis-- rather than "for all" in the current translation.

* In the Nicene Creed the opening word, Credo, will be correctly translated as "I believe" rather than "we believe."

* When the priest says, "The Lord be with you," the faithful respond, "And with your spirit," rather than simply, "And also with you."

* In the Eucharistic prayer, references to the Church will use the pronouns "she" and "her" rather than "it."

* In the Agnus Dei, the text cites the "Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world," rather than using the singular word "sin."

* In the preferred form of the penitential rite, the faithful will acknowledge that they have sinned "through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault.".

Those of us who appreciate tradition, and literature will be dancing for joy over these new changes.

But not in the aisle.

At least not during Mass!

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4 comments:

Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

LOL!!! I love your last three sentences!!

Dymphna (4HisChurch) said...

Thanks!:)

Cygnus said...

I am so looking forward to these changes, especially the more accurate "for many."

Dymphna (4HisChurch) said...

Cyg,
Think we'll live to see them? ;)

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"Slavery ended in medieval Europe only because the church extended its sacraments to all slaves and then managed to impose a ban on the enslavement of Christians (and of Jews). Within the context of medieval Europe, that prohibition was effectively a rule of universal abolition. "— Rodney Stark

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